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Obverse of 1845-O Eagle     Reverse of 1845-O Eagle


1845-O TEN DOLLARS OR EAGLE

PCGS No: 8593, 88593

Mintage:

Circulation strikes: 47,500
Proofs: 0

Designer: Christian Gobrecht

Diameter: 26.8 millimeters

Metal content:
Gold - 90%
Other - 10% 

Weight: 258 grains (16.7 grams)

Edge: Reeded

Mintmark: "O" (for New Orleans, LA) below the eagle on the reverse

Images courtesy of Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.

Recent appearances:
PCGS MS-63.  Ex - Bowers and Merena Galleries, "The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part IV Sale", November 20-21, 2000, Lot 610, "..So Called 845 over 1844, but not really an overdate", illustrated, sold for $46,000.00  From the Bowers and Merena sale of the Richard E. Eliasberg, Sr. Collection, October 1982, Lot 674; earlier from the John H. Clapp Collection, B. Max Mehl's sale of the James Ten Eyck Collection in May 1922, and the Chapman brothers' sale of the Thomas Cleneay Collection in December 1890; the finest graded by PCGS

PCGS AU-53.  Ex - Bowers & Merena Galleries' "The Cabinet of Lucien M. LaRiviere, Part II", March 15-17, 2001, Lot 187, "Breen-6869, Repunched 84" Not sold

NGC AU-50 (illustrated above).  Ex - Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Inc.'s "The California Sale", October 2-3, 2000, Lot 1032, where it was described as follows: "Well struck by lapped dies and with some luster in the fields. During the coining process, the planchet feeding mechanism sometimes jams, in which case the dies clash together without a planchet between them. As more and more coins are struck, dies often clash together several times, imparting some of their respective designs on the opposing die. The fields of the dies start to show wear also, sometimes die cracks appear from the intense strain of pounding metal on metal. When dies become clashed, cracked or worn, they are often removed, carefully ground down with files and repolished. This process extends the useful life of the dies, but also reduces the depth of the devices, as the fields are literally lowered, and the relief becomes more shallow. Parts of the original devices may be entirely ground away in this process, one of the more famous is the "three legged buffalo" nickel of 1937.
On this particular coin, the obverse die was lapped, disconnecting Liberty's hair curls down the back of her neck, so they now appear as lumps. Similarly, her hair beads are smaller and no longer connected. The surfaces show moderate handling marks, as always seen on circulated gold. This coin shows the double cut 84 in the date, noted as "rare" in Breen's wonderful Encyclopedia." @ $1,322.00

AU-50.  Ex - Bowers and Merena Galleries, "The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part IV Sale", November 20-21, 2000, Lot 611, "Repunched 84", illustrated, sold for $2,990.00  From Stack's sale of the Bartle Collection, October 1984, Lot 1155

Net EF-45.  Ex - Bowers and Merena Galleries, "The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part IV Sale", November 20-21, 2000, Lot 612, "Repunched 84", illustrated, sold for $1,035.00  Purchased from Lester Merkin's sale of March 1969, Lot 404

Net EF-40.  Ex - Bowers and Merena Galleries, "The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part IV Sale", November 20-21, 2000, Lot 613, "Repunched 84", illustrated, sold for $690.00  Purchased from Jack L. Klausen on June 17, 1968

EF-40.  Ex - Bowers and Merena Galleries, "The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Collection, Part IV Sale", November 20-21, 2000, Lot 614, "Repunched 84", illustrated, not sold  From the Bowers and Merena sale of the Armand Champa Collection, May 1972, Lot 548

A strong Very Fine, approaching Extremely Fine.  Ex - Stack's "65th Anniversary Sale", October 17-19, 2000, Lot 1809, not plated, sold for $460.00

Notes:
The finest example graded by PCGS is a single MS-61.

The finest "Repunched Date" examples graded by PCGS are 2 EF-45's.

Sources and/or recommended reading:
"The PCGS Population Report, July 2003" by The Professional Coin Grading Service