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Obverse of 1714 Gloucester Token     Reverse of 1714 Gloucester Token

  
1714 GLOUCESTER TOKENS

Notes:
The 1714 Gloucester Token is a small brass piece that may have been a pattern intended for a silver Shilling.  Prior to 1981, only two examples were known (the one illustrated above).  Because the legends were incomplete, experts speculated that the building on the front of the coin was a warehouse or official government building (possibly a courthouse).  The date is barely legible on the back, but enough detail remains to date it positively as 1714.  The name on the back was believed to have been Richard Dawson.

In 1981, a third(?) example turned up with sufficient detail to solve the question of the legends.  Combining information from both coins, the obverse legend reads in full: "GLOVCESTER COVRTHOVSE VIRGINIA".  The legend on the back of the coin reads: "RIGHAVLT DAWSON ANNO DOM 1714".

Images courtesy of Stack's

Known examples (3): 
1. Ex - Ten Eyck - Parmelee - Seavey - Clay - Newcomer - John Work Garrett - Bowers & Ruddy Galleries "The Garrett Collection Sales, Part 3", October 1-2, 1980, Lot 1318, illustrated, sold for $36,000.00 - Stack's "The John L. Roper, 2nd" Public Auction, December 8-9, 1983, Lot 147, illustrated, "Brass.  61.1 grains, Crosby plate IX, no. 4...a crude Fine."

2. Mentioned by Crosby.  This has to be different from #2 above because Crosby stated that the legends could not be deciphered by the two pieces of which he knew (#2 solved the riddle).

3. Discovered in 1981 - Anthony Terranova

2. Mentioned by Crosby.  This has to be different from #2 above because Crosby stated that the legends could not be deciphered by the two pieces of which he knew (#2 solved the riddle).